Brian Dear [Free Read] The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO System and the Dawn of Cyberculture – PDF & eBook


  • Hardcover
  • 640
  • The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO System and the Dawn of Cyberculture
  • Brian Dear
  • English
  • 09 July 2019
  • 9781101871553

10 thoughts on “The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO System and the Dawn of Cyberculture

  1. says:

    I must admit that came into this book a little wary I could tell from the introduction that Brian Dear has a chip on his shoulder about UIUC and the midwest in general being underappreciated for their technical advancements and it's a major complaint you'll hear anytime you get a tour of the engineering or related departments at UI

  2. says:

    What a wild ride While at times it was a bit slow especially near the end this book is still phenomenally well researched and captivating I knew almost nothing about the PLATO computer having only even heard about it a month ago now I can't believe it's not a canonical part of computer history If you're at all interested in early computing cyberculture the dawn of video games or just alternative looks at tech history re

  3. says:

    Most people have never heard of PLATO But they're familiar with all manner of things which were developed on PLATOIt was originally conceived as a way to provide Computer Aided Instruction CAI The idea was that while a hum

  4. says:

    A compelling deep eminently readable history of a glaring blindspot in much of popular computer history PLATO pops up Forrest Gump like in the background of almost every computer history story we know that overlaps with its nearly six decade lifespan inspiring the Dynabook inspiring Lotus Notes inspiring some of Ted Nelson

  5. says:

    Five star books get that high ranking from me when they deliver an emotional connection Sometimes it is because of a topic covered at times it is the strength of the writing that forges that connection Here it is a linkag

  6. says:

    It feels like this took me a million years to read but I'm glad I stuck with it Dense with information it really blew my mind how much PLATO did before anyone else and the community it built among its users both in Champaign Urbana and around the world I'm probably biased for this since I'm currently a UIUC graduate student and barely a sto

  7. says:

    Brian Dear The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO System and the Dawn of Cyberculture is one of the most knowledgeable and humane books I've read about the history of computing here about the PLATO system I rarely do this but I recommend The Friendly Orange Glow highly and without reserves and

  8. says:

    This book is a tour de force as it sweeps through 25 years of missing computing history It adroitly weaves the complex technical personal and business story of PLATO It's a compelling narrative held together by gr

  9. says:

    “The Friendly Orange Glow” by Brian De

  10. says:

    The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO system and the dawn of cyberculture 2017 by Brian Dear is a fascinating but wildly too long account of the PLATO interactive networked computer system developed at the University of IllinoisPLATO was clearly an incredibly advanced system that had high speed interactive graphics

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Brian Dear â 0 Summary

The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO System and the Dawn of Cyberculture

Oment This book is as much the biography of a vision as it is the story of the people behind PLATO Every technology story whether it's about the steam engine airplane telephone Model T or recently Apple Google and Tesla electric car has at its core a vision It is the immutable nature of technology and technology visions to run full life cycles from cradle to grave PLATO's story is no different Like all technology visions PLATO grew outdated and was disrupted by competing visions The Friendly Orange Glow is a revelatory paradigm for our technological age This book is a tour de force as it sweeps through 25 years of missing computing history It adroitly weaves the complex technical personal and business story of PLATO It s a compelling narrative held together by great vignettes of the key players who developed the system software and applicationsPlato was a mainframe system originally with custom terminals built to provide computer based education but its authoring system was used to build an entire ecosystem way beyond its designer s original intent multi user games chat rooms email online news and All appearing ten to twenty years before these ideas were reinvented as commercial online systems or on desktop computersA good book is one you can t put down A great book is one that raises uestions beyond the books subject This is one of the great ones CDC buying Plato was one of the corporate slow motion train wrecks that is still painful to read The story of CDC itself is even a larger disaster A large company trying to buy the output of an RD lab and productize its output is still fraught with difficulties even in the 21st century As I read I wondered what if CERL and Plato had been at Stanford rather than U of I in the late 1970 s Would sitting in the middle of an entrepreneurial ecosystem have spurred spinouts And would those spinouts have been better managed surrounded by venture capitalists and other experienced entrepreneursIt also makes me think of the other still born computer entrepreneurial cluster in the Midwest Minneapolis It was the home of ERA CDC Cray ETA and Honeywell In spite of all that history the area failed to attract entrepreneurs startups and capital at scale Yet Minneapolis still has a healthy medical device ecosystem built around MedtronicWere the failures of these two Midwest clusters similar Did they not catch fire from the lack of risk capital venture and angel Not understanding the difference between small business startups and corporate management Lack of an ecosystem that was a magnet for attracting non academic risk taking talent Lack of technical and business press that made their innovations and environment known to the rest of the countryAs great as the book is there was one down side that almost made me stop reading it and therefore the four stars At least for me the extremely detailed recounting of every game on the system and game developer while great for the audience of readers who knew Plato bogged down the narrative A good editor could have made the point of how revolutionary these gaming innovations were but could have shortened this section by at least 20 pagesBut I m glad I continued because this was a wonderful and enlightening piece of computing historyKudos to the author

Read & download ´ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook â Brian Dear

The remarkable untold story of PLATO the computer program and platform created in the 1960s that marked the true beginning of cyberculture a book that will rewrite the history of computing and the InternetHere is the story of the brilliant eccentric designers developers and denizens often teenagers and twentysomethings of the PLATO system a computer network so far ahead of its time and with a list of hardware and software innovations so long that it's almost inconceivable that it actually existed and existed so long ago only to fade almost entirely from What a wild ride While at times it was a bit slow especially near the end this book is still phenomenally well researched and captivating I knew almost nothing about the PLATO computer having only even heard about it a month ago now I can t believe it s not a canonical part of computer history If you re at all interested in early computing cyberculture the dawn of video games or just alternative looks at tech history read this book

Summary The Friendly Orange Glow The Untold Story of the PLATO System and the Dawn of Cyberculture

Public view The many thousands of people who used the system have held on to the PLATO ideas throughout their careers influencing countless technological products and programs from flat panel wall TVs and touch sensitive screens to chat rooms instant messaging screen savers multiplayer games flight simulators crowdsourcing interactive fiction emoticons and e learning Fascinating first hand and revelatory The Friendly Orange Glow makes clear that the work of PLATO practitioners has profoundly shaped the computer industry from its inception to our very m It feels like this took me a million years to read but I m glad I stuck with it Dense with information it really blew my mind how much PLATO did before anyone else and the community it built among its users both in Champaign Urbana and around the world I m probably biased for this since I m currently a UIUC graduate student and barely a stone s throw away from such monuments to PLATO like the Power House and CSL but I d highly recommend this to anyone interested in computing history and the connective power of computers and a bunch of programming nerds sitting around monitors late at night drinking Mountain Dew and playing Airfight Also it s hard to hate a book which features a cameo from Leonard Nimoy himself