Naoko Abe Read The Sakura Obsession – eBook or Kindle

Read The Sakura Obsession

Ted a garden of cherry varieties In 1926 he learned that the Great White Cherry had become extinct in Japan Six years later he buried a living cutting from his own collection in a potato and repatriated it via the Trans Siberian Express In the years that followed Ingram sent than 100 varieties of cherry tree to new homes around the globe from. 20 MAR 2019 a lunchtime listen to recommendation through Laura Many thanks Listen here APR 2019 finished my listening today over lunch hour Very enjoyable

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The Sakura Obsession

Auckland to Washington As much a history of the cherry blossom in Japan as it is the story of one remarkable man the narrative follows the flower from its adoption as a national symbol in 794 through its use as an emblem of imperialism in the 1930s to the present day worldwide obsession with forecasting the exact moment of the trees' flowering. As an avid gardener ok obsessive who had to seek out flowering cherry trees within a hundred mile radius I loved this book But this book is far than gardening it s Japanese history and sadly my beloved cherry trees are forever linked to the fleeting lives of youth in war Such a contrast from beauty to death love books that teach me new things but not sure I like what I learned

Naoko Abe ¸ 4 Summary

The remarkable 1200 year history of the Japanese cherry blossom tree and how it was saved from extinction by an English gardenerCollingwood Cherry Ingram first fell in love with the sakura or cherry tree when he visited Japan on his honeymoon in 1907 So taken with the plant he brought back hundreds of cuttings with him to England where he crea. How did growing than one variety of flowering cherry tree become a treasonable offenseFrom The Spectator s review Between 1639 and 1853 seeds and scions of flowering cherry trees travelled across Japan to Edo present day Tokyo Each came from the most beautiful specimens of varieties of tree from the different principalities of Japan From mountainous regions came the light pink yama zakura from the chilly climates of Hokkaido and northern Honshu came the crimson Ohyama zakura Mame zakura with their neat skirt like white petals came from Mount Fuji and the rainy Izu islands produced Oshima cherries with large white flowersIn the 1920s 30s cherry trees killed by the Great Kanto Earthuake and pollution were replaced with just a single variety the fast growing somei yoshino partly due to this species hardiness and partly as a method of propaganda In the lead up to and during the second world war emphasis was placed on the short flowering life of the increasingly abundant somei yoshino so that the cherry blossom once the mark of a peaceful diverse people became a symbol of a conforming unified population willing to die for the emperor While many cherry species began to die out in Japan individualism and free speech were suppressed and restricted too This sounds like a must read I was still waiting for my copy of Cherry Ingram when I came across another Japanese botanicalagricultural story this one about how under Japanese occupation Korea went from multiple varieties of rice to just a few high output white varieties Japanese varieties went from making up 2 to 3 percent of Korea s rice to 90 percent Korea uickly became Japan s breadbasket increasing its rice production by than 250 percent eventually supplying almost 98 percent of Japanese rice imports


10 thoughts on “The Sakura Obsession

  1. says:

    From BBC radio 4 Book of the weekCollingwood Ingram known as 'Cherry' after his defining life's work was born in 1880 and lived to a hundred years old witnessing a fraught century of conflict and changeIngram's interest was piued by visits to Japan in 1902 and 1907 and further when he moved to The Grange in Benenden Kent in 1919 an

  2. says:

    35 stars rounded up Collingwood “Cherry” Ingram was an Englishman who developed a passion indeed an obsession with the

  3. says:

    How did growing than one variety of flowering cherry tree become a treasonable offense?From The Spectator's review Between 1639 and 1853 seeds and scions of flowering cherry trees travelled across Japan to Edo present day Tokyo Each came from the most beautiful specimens of varieties of tree from the different principalities of Japan From mountainous regions came the light pink yama zakura; from the chilly climates of Hokkaido and northern

  4. says:

    20 MAR 2019 a lunchtime listen to recommendation through Laura Many thanks Listen here APR 2019 finished my listening today over lu

  5. says:

    I sure enjoyed the first half of this immensely but then it got into the war which was too sad and depressing I learned some things I had never heard before and had to uit reading it for a bit I got back into the book when she went back to telling about cherry trees and three of the oldest one of which is 1500 years old It is almost as old as a bristle cone pine I greatly admire Ingram and it was so fun reading about him I recommend this

  6. says:

    Sakura as the decorative flowering cherry trees are called in Japan are widely distributed across the world This is the charming tale of one man's captivation of the glorious cherry tree and how he became one of the world's

  7. says:

    I found this book very engaging and informative I think it did a great job of introducing many of the cherry varieties and Mr Ingrams passion for them without being too technical or verbose I very much enjoyed learning of

  8. says:

    As an avid gardener ok obsessive who had to seek out flowering cherry trees within a hundred mile radius I loved this book But this book is far than gardening it’s Japanese history and sadly my beloved cherry trees are forever linked to the fleeting lives of youth in war Such a contrast from beauty to death love books that teach me new things but not sure I like what I learned

  9. says:

    An absolutely brilliant fascinating book

  10. says:

    BOTWhttpswwwbbccoukprogrammesm000Description Collingwood Ingram known as 'Cherry' after his defining life's work was born in 1880 and lived to a hundred years old witnessing a fraught century of conflict and changeIngram's interest was piued by visits to Japan in 1902 and 1907 and further when he moved to The Grange in Benenden Kent in 1919 and discovered two magnificent cherry trees in the neglected garden of his new family ho