Epub [The Pragmatic Programmer From Journeyman to Master theology] AUTHOR Andy Hunt – eBook, Kindle and Epub Read

Andy Hunt ´ 5 Summary

Teams of pragmatic programmers; and Make your developments precise with automation Written as a series of self contained sections and filled with entertaining anecdotes thoughtful examples and interesting analogies The Pragmatic Programmer illustrates the best practices and major pitfalls of many different aspects of software development Whether youre a new coder an experienced progra. This is my favorite non technical tech book It explores good software development practices In my opinion it is than just a checklist of what you should do it literally changed my approach to development with positive resultsOthers have mentionned that they already knew most of the things in this book and practice these good habits in their development environments I ve worked in dozens of environments ranging from very successful experienced companies to fly by night operations that have no business writing code Any one of these environments would have been vastly improved if some of these practices were incorporated And in several environments I was able to introduce some of these concepts which led to increases in productivity and happinessIf you and your organization already does everything in this book and you see it as a ho hum read congratulations to you For the rest of us I think this is chocked full of high level abstract concepts that will improve any development environment It s communicated in a very straight forward manner and also advises you to take a pragmatic approach to everything only using the things that make sense in your situationOverall a wonderful book

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The Pragmatic Programmer From Journeyman to Master

Ward Cunningham Straight from the programming trenches The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process taking a reuirement and producing working maintainable code that delights its users It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniue. This is essentially a self help guide for programmers the kind of book that enumerates the habits of Good and Happy People and makes you feel slightly guilty about not practicing most of them but probably won t result in you forsaking your evil ways and stepping on the path toward Nirvana Hunt and Thomas are friendly but occasionally annoying gurus Their cloying metaphors boiled frogs etc and kitsch jokes are offputting and some of their advice borders on insult One assumes that when they devote a whole section to interpersonal communication that they are targetting the particularly closeted and uncouth breed of computer geek recently emerged from the dark and brutish cave of high school struggling to make headway in a world full of messy inconsistent emotional people who don t even know how to reverse grep an Apache logThat said I think there are nuggets of good advice for everyone all over the book Programming like reading and writing is ultimately a private personal activity and to be honest most of us software engineers were that closeted high school nerd at some point and draw upon that focused single minded persona when we do things like coding so there are lessons to be learned from taking a step back occasionally and examining the craft as Hunt and Thomas do They are as I said occasionally infuriating but even their silly aphorisms and mantras are usually memorable what software engineer isn t constantly trying to stay DRY I ve no doubt I ll be flipping through it again in the future especially when I feel like I ve hit a wall fell in a rut or found myself exploiting tired and hackneyed idioms that don t do the English language any justice

Free read The Pragmatic Programmer From Journeyman to Master

S for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse Read this book and youll learn how to Fight software rot; Avoid the trap of duplicating knowledge; Write flexible dynamic and adaptable code; Avoid programming by coincidence; Bullet proof your code with contracts assertions and exceptions; Capture real reuirements; Test ruthlessly and effectively; Delight your users; Build. Who is this book forCertainly not for experienced skilled software developers Considering myself at least experienced I found most of the material in this book a rehash of methodologies and techniues I ve used for than a decade Granted there were a few gems here and there but mostly I was bored because I didn t learn anything newOne has to respect that this book is from 1999 so in that perspective it must have been uite ground breaking Had I read it in 1999 I wouldn t have known any of these thingsThe uestion is though would I have been able to use this book for anything back then While I found myself agreeing with lots of advice given in the book I also found that the reason I could agree with so much is that the advice is so vague that you can read your own interpretation into itPerhaps you could view that as a strength of the contents It attempts to plant a lot of seeds into the readers minds without ever being prescriptive or dogmatic In that sense it lives up to its titular pragmatismStill it leaves me with the feeling that if you don t already know how to work in this way will you be able to learn it from the book I don t think soAs an overall observation it seems that most of what the authors call pragmatic programming is simply what s later become known as agile development Thus I have much respect for the authors in 1999 they were certainly at the bleeding edge of modern software development perhaps they still are today but I don t think the book stands the test of time


10 thoughts on “The Pragmatic Programmer From Journeyman to Master

  1. says:

    While many complain about already knowing everything in the book or that it's outdated I believe they are uite missing the point Perhaps this book didn't speak to you at the point you are at in developing your skills and crafts but it might speak to someone else just beginning Rating the book low for the reason it wasn't what you n

  2. says:

    This is essentially a self help guide for programmers the kind of book that enumerates the habits of Good and Happy People and makes you feel

  3. says:

    I no longer have any need for mentors or friends now that I have AVClub the AVA and Gateways to Geekery columns in particular uora and Stack OverflowCase in point That I found this book Over the past couple of year

  4. says:

    A must read for any developer who yearns to fine tune their craft

  5. says:

    Who is this book for?Certainly not for experienced skilled software developers Considering myself at least expe

  6. says:

    40 Good for new programmersThis seems to be a favorite in the office so before I participating in the recommending of this book to new hires

  7. says:

    For a total beginner the concepts will be difficult to internalize For a seasoned programmer on a good team it will be little than a general reinforcement While it's hard to imagine the right time in one's career to read the The Pragmatic Programmer probably often it's a classic It's written at a high enough level that very little material is outdated In fact some of the arguments ring much truer now than they would ha

  8. says:

    This is my favorite non technical tech book It explores good software development practices In my opinion it is than just a checklist of what you should do it literally changed my approach to development with posi

  9. says:

    I didn't like the structure of the book Some of the concepts were vaguely presented I was also bored a little bit while reading itSome notesChapter 1 A Pragmatic PhilosophyTip 3 Provide Options Don't Make Lame ExcusesBefore you approach anyone to tell them why something can't be done is late or is broken stop and re evaluateTip 4 Don't Live with Broken WindowsDon't leave broken windows bad designs wrong decisions or poor code un repairedT

  10. says:

    In fact it's a good book if you're just beginning to program I've just read it late so it contains nothing new t

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